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Miami's Hidden Gems: A Journey Beyond the Beach

submitted on 27 December 2023 by peruginigroup.com

The Venetian Pool: A Dip into History

In the heart of Coral Gables, a city known for its Mediterranean Revival style, lies the Venetian Pool, a historic public swimming pool that could easily be mistaken for a scene from a 1920s movie set. Carved out of a coral rock quarry, this aquatic paradise is fed by spring water and adorned with waterfalls and grottos. It's a place where one can swim laps alongside the ghosts of socialites from a bygone era, all while pondering why their own neighborhood pool is just a rectangle filled with chlorinated water and unfulfilled dreams.

The Ancient Spanish Monastery: A Time-Traveling Conundrum

Next on our list is the Ancient Spanish Monastery, a structure that raises more questions than it answers. Originally built in the 12th century in Segovia, Spain, this building was purchased by William Randolph Hearst in the 1920s, dismantled stone by stone, and shipped to the United States. It's a place that makes one wonder about the logistics of such an endeavor and whether Hearst ever considered just buying a postcard of the monastery instead.

The Kampong: A Botanical Wonderland

Tucked away in the Coconut Grove neighborhood, The Kampong is a tropical garden that feels like a world away from the glitz and glamour of South Beach. This hidden oasis is home to a collection of rare and exotic plants that will have botany enthusiasts and Instagram influencers alike in a state of green-fingered ecstasy. It's a reminder that Miami's true beauty often lies in its natural wonders, not just in its neon lights.

The Wolfsonian-FIU: A Temple of Eclectic Artifacts

For those who find traditional museums a tad too predictable, The Wolfsonian-FIU offers a refreshing change of pace. This museum, located in the heart of Miami Beach, houses an eclectic collection of objects from the Industrial Age to the end of the Second World War. It's a place where one can ponder why someone felt the need to design a toaster that looks like a miniature skyscraper, among other curiosities.

Stiltsville: Miami's Offshore Mystery

Off the coast of Biscayne Bay, a curious sight awaits: a group of wooden houses perched on stilts above the shallow waters. Known as Stiltsville, these structures have survived hurricanes, legal battles, and the test of time. They stand as a testament to Miami's quirky side, a side that says, "Sure, we could build houses on land, but where's the fun in that?"

The Coral Castle: A Monument to Lost Love

In the city of Homestead lies the Coral Castle, a structure that is as much a monument to heartbreak as it is to ingenuity. Built by Edward Leedskalnin in the early 20th century, this oolite limestone structure was allegedly constructed in memory of his lost love. It's a place that will have visitors marveling at the sculptures and scratching their heads at how one man, armed with nothing but hand tools and a broken heart, could create such a wonder.

The Miami Circle: A Prehistoric Puzzle

At the mouth of the Miami River lies a mysterious circle of holes carved into the bedrock, known as the Miami Circle. Believed to be the remains of a Tequesta Indian structure, this archaeological site offers a rare glimpse into the pre-Columbian history of the area. It's a sobering reminder that Miami's story didn't start with art deco and neon, but with a people whose history is still being uncovered.



 







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